Zaha Hadid & Gareth Neals Collaborate to Produce Fluid Sculptural Vessels

Renowned architect Zaha Hadid and British designer Gareth Neal collaborated on these fluid sculptural wood vessels.

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Photographer: Petr Krejci

Embodying technology and tradition, these sculptural oak vases sit at the intersection of two design disciplines. The vessels were designed as part of a project presented by the American Hardwood Export Council and Benchmark Furniture and originally exhibited at the V&A museum during the London Design festival last year.

The almost fluid flowing form designed by Zaha Hadid and Gareth Neal illustrates the fusion between technological innovation and traditional wood techniques.

“I was keen to take advantage of the Hadid studio’s advance computer modelling software, pushing the boundaries of digital tools. I was particularly interested in the idiosyncrasies of traditional hand processes such as a hand thrown pot, or a raised piece of silverware and how simulating these could be achieved through digital imitation. Through using the traditional vessel form as a starting point and subverting its appearance to dramatic extremes, mimicking traditional carving techniques I hope the pieces will embed the design with a sense of the handmade through the arm of a robot, questioning the viewer’s perceptions of craft and the handmade,” Neal explained of the works.